Overall Objectives

Individual and team sports play an important part of student life.  In addition to physical well-being, this sports program develop students’ self-confidence, competitive instinct, teamwork skills, and leadership abilities.  The life lesson of learning and improving yourself after failure (by losing a match) is also taught through competitive sports.  Self-discipline and dedication are reinforced through this sports program.

Programme Description

The development plan has a structured framework specific to age, ability and relative performance measures. This program has key development phases and objectives which are critical in the sporting and pedagogical development of student-athletes.  The development pathway of all student-athletes is closely monitored and adjusted according to individual needs. The program strategy is built on holistic development of all athletes, coaching and life skills through sports, developing habits for a healthy life.

Description of each session:

 

(Short Sprints):

  1. a) 6 min easy run on grass

  2. b) Circuit Training: 3 x 8 exercises x 30 seconds work/30 seconds rest (e.g. Press ups, Sit ups, Lunges, Step ups, Torso roller, Skydiver, Seated leg extension, Scissor squat thrust) 2.5 min rest between sets

  3. c) 10 easy min run on grass

(Distance): Running at an easy pace builds endurance, promotes proper form, establishes routine and base mileage, and facilitates recovery. This type of run should be your most common, making up about 65-80% of your mileage

 

(Short Sprints):

  • a) Sprint Drills

  • b) 1x 600m, 400m, 200m @ 70%

  • c) 1x 250m, 150m @ 75% [walk next distance to be run;  6 min between sets]

(Distance): Tempo Run: The tempo run’s pace is often called comfortably hard. Difficult enough to require pushing, but comfortable enough to where you can sustain the effort. This is often around 85-90% of your max heart-rate, or just a hair slower than your 10K race pace, where short sentences are possible, but a full-blown conversation isn’t.

  1. Workout: 40 minute run with 3 x 5 minutes at tempo pace, and a 3 minute recovery in between. For this style workout, you’ll start the 40-minute run with an easy warmup, once warm, begin five minute tempo intervals with three minutes of rest, and repeat three times. Allow for time at the end to cool down.

  2. Workout: 90 minute run with 3 x 15 minutes at tempo pace, and an 8 minute recovery in between. A workout like this, with longer tempo intervals, is great for marathon racing speed.

  3. Workout: 60 minute run with 3 x 8 minutes at a tempo pace, and a 4 minute recovery, include hills during tempo sections. Tempo workouts can also include hill training, which is particularly helpful while training for a hilly race.

 

(Short Sprints):

  • a) 6 min easy run on grass

  • b) Circuit Training

  • c) 10 easy min run on grass

(Distance): Progression Run:

  1. Thirds Workout: 15 minutes at an easy pace, 15 minutes at a comfortably hard pace, 15 minutes at a hard pace. In this workout, you’ll increase speed at every 15 minute increment throughout the run, starting at an easy pace and making your way up to a hard pace.

  2. Fast Finish Workout: 30 minutes at a comfortably easy pace, 10 minutes at a hard pace, 5 minutes all out. Here you’re maintaining the easy pace throughout most of the run, until the final 15 minutes when you increase to hard and then all out. This a great option for mimicking a late race push.

 

(Short Sprints):

  • a) Sprint Drills

  • b) 1x 600m, 400m, 200m @ 70%

  • c) 1x 250m, 150m @ 75% [walk next distance to be run;  6 min between sets]

(Distance): Hill Run: offers many of the same benefits of a traditional speed workout, without having to run at top speed. Running uphill is all about building that explosive power that promotes speed and improved running economy.  Running downhill works your quads, and builds strength in your tendons and joints.

 

(Short Sprints):

  • a) 6 min easy run on grass

  • b)  Circuit Training: 3 x 8 exercises

    x 30 seconds work/30 seconds rest (E.g. Press ups, Sit ups, Lunges, Step ups, Torso roller, Skydiver, Seated leg extension, Scissor squat thrust) 2.5 min rest between sets

  • c) 10 easy min run on grass

(Distance): The Interval Workout: A set distance, repeated a set number of times, at a set pace. Usually with a short rest period in between. Interval distances can be anywhere from 100 meters to a 2km or more.

  1. Workout: 8 x 400 meters on the track with a 400 meter light jog in between. Try to maintain a consistent pace for each of the 400 meter intervals.

  2. Workout 800s: 10 x 800 meters on the track, with a light jog for the same amount of time it took you to run each 800 in between.

  3. Workout: 2 x 1,000 meters with 2 minute rest periods + 2 x 800 meters with 90 second rest periods + 2 x 400 meters on the track with 60 second rest periods. In this workout you’re decreasing in the length of each interval, but increasing in pace.

  4. Workout: 4 x 1,600m with 120 seconds recovery in between. This is an endurance building interval workout. Aim to maintain a consistent pace for each mile, or increase slightly in pace over each interval.

 

(Short Sprints): Hill runs:15- 20 min x fast relaxed reps on shallow hills x 80m- 120m (walk down

(Distance): Fartlek Workout: fartlek means speed-play in Swedish, and that’s exactly what the workout is. An opportunity to play around with different speeds and distances in a single workout. Intermix fast running with slower running, and vary the pace and distance of each interval. It could be as flexible as randomly picking a street corner, tree, car, or lamp post to sprint to, or run at a tempo pace for three minutes, followed by an easy pace for four minutes, and a sprint for one minute, and so on. There are no rules, other than to have variety in your paces and distances.

 

(Short Sprints):

  • a) 10-12 min light fartlek on undulating terrain

  • b) 6-8 x 120m-150m relaxed strides on grass

  • c) 8-10 min steady relaxed on grass

(Distance): Long Run Workout: strategically planned long runs throughout training are a great opportunity to work on late race speed, mimic the final push on race day, and toughen the athlete’s mind to push through the fatigue.

 

 

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