League Rugby has lot been part of Singapore’s sporting landscape, and with the booming popularity of Touch & Tag Rugby, we offer for all three formats:

a) Coaches for training school teams in educational institutions and schools;

b) Organizing rugby leagues, events and competitions;

c) Introductory courses & lessons for rugby beginners or interested individuals (particularly Touch & Tag rugby)

 

Our Coaches are well certified in World Rugby Coaching, World Rugby Strength & Conditioning, and also posses the local Singapore equivalent certification.

The objective of this programme is to provide students with a basic knowledge, skills, and understanding of Contact & Touch Rugby. Students would improve hand-eye coordination as well as psycho-motor skills through modified mini-games Students would take home with them basic knowledge of the game such as the correct way to catch a rugby ball, to pass a rugby ball, to tackle an opponent.

 

Students will:

-Be educated about the overview of the game of Contact Rugby, history of the game

-Learn the appropriate warm up for the sport

-Learn simplified rules and regulation

-Learn basic footwork

-Learn proper passing

-Learn how to score a point

-Engage in a simple and interactive game with peers

Touch Rugby

Intro to touch

– what is touch

– what is the game about?

Warm up activity

Shuttle run – to develop agility

-In teams of 6 children compete in a relay where the first player tags one witches hat at a time to 3 stations 10m apart. The next player must then do the same thing. The first team finished wins the game.
Stationary team line pass

–           to develop passing and catching skills in a team situation.

–           Players divide into teams and position themselves in the correct alignment (2-3m apart) Ball is then passed along the line until it reaches the end. The player at the end of the line runs around behind the other players and is then at the front of the line. The other members of the group shuffle along. Passing should be done to both the left and the right.

Zig Zag pass

In a zig zag formation the ball starts at one end and is passed back down again. A competitive element can be added by seeing which group is finished first with no dropped balls, or how many passes can be made in a certain time limit.

Team line passing with touch skills

Aim- is to develop basic catch and pass, player alignment and touchdown skills.

The ball is passed along the line until it reaches the end. The player scores the touchdown over the line and runs to the opposite end of the line. The ball is again passed down the line after a shuffle towards the score line. The game finishes when each player has scored a touch down.

Pair tap and pass

-in pair players move down the field tapping the ball on the ground and passing to a moving player. The receiver of the ball then runs the passer onside (i.e. runs straight forward until they are in front of the original passer) who then taps on the ground and passes to the player, when the pair return to the starting point the next pair begins.

Picking up a stationary ball

Students form 2 lines about 15-20m apart facing each other. One player moves forward and picks up the ball placed 3-5m away and then runs and places the ball on the ground 3-5m in front of the opposition player and joins the opposite line. The first player of the opposing line then repeats this procedure and so on until all players have been through

Set up and organise teams for minor game

Contact Rugby

Rugby Passing Drills

The following rugby drills focus on improving basic passing and handling skills including the basic pass, switch pass, pop pass, loop pass, miss pass, offload pass from tackles and the floor.

Passing Warm Up and Fitness Drills

Passing drills which can be used as a team warm up or as fitness training drills. They include basic passing techniques with team movement and coordination. Good communication skills between players are essential.

Passing Games & Drills

The following drills bring more players into small sided passing type games adding a little time pressure and a competitive element to the skill as well as offloading through tackles and from the floor in groups.

Footwork & Agility

Rugby footwork and agility drills demonstrate how to develop skills to side step, swerve, spin and offload the ball with the aim of avoiding tackles and keeping the ball moving. By practicing the footwork skills repeatedly in isolation or as part of a practice drill then eventually the movements become automatic and emerge naturally in a game situation.

Tackling

Rugby drills which introduce players to tackling and gradually build confidence. Beginners start with learning the basic techniques by doing a slow motion tackle from the knees. This is progressed to tackling on one knee, then standing through to one v one full contact tackling practices.

Rucking

A ruck occurs when the ball is on the ground and at least one player from each side are in physical contact with the ball between them. It is a technique used to get or keep possession of the ball, after a player has been tackled in open play. The following rugby drills build up player confidence and technique.

Mauling

The maul is often used when a team needs to regain control of the ball, or because the opposition have partially stopped the attack. A maul is also used to unsettle the defense, but it is important to keep the ball moving. The following drills help develop team mauling skills.

The Scrum

The scrum is used to restart play if the ball has been knocked on or gone forwards in some way, if the ball fails to come out of a ruck or maul and aslo for an accidental offside. The following practice drills build up the scrum starting the the front row only and adding players until all eight are involved.

Line Out

A line out occurs when the ball goes out of play. The following drills and practices help a team develop skills to win the lineout including lifting where safety is essential.

Specific Positions

Whats your position on the rugby pitch? We explain the roles and demands of specific positions on the pitch including prop forward, hooker, second row, back row, fly half, srum half, centres, wingers and full back.

Kicking

Kicking in rugby can be used as a defensive or an attacking tactic, depending on the situation. It is a good way to clear the danger if the team are under pressure. However with a good kick over the top of the opposition they can be the team under pressure. We explain seven different kicking techniques a player may use in a competitive game situation.

Rules Organisation & Coaching

We explain how rugby is organised and how to get involved in coaching rugby. The difference between rugby league and rugby union, the history of rugby and common rugby injuries.

To get more info, email us at info@mof.com.sg  or Whatsapp 92799006 or click this: https://api.whatsapp.com/send?phone=6592799006